Vincent ‘Fatz’ Caruso, leader with his mother of a faded North Shore fentanyl empire, gets more than 20 years in prison

North Shore fentanyl empire “Fatz” controlled with machine gun power and its mother is no more – mother-son kingpins will trade tacky jewelry and Gucci hoodies for prison jumpsuits .

“This family business has been permanently closed,” Joshua Levy, Massachusetts’ first assistant U.S. attorney, said in a statement.

“Caruso and his associates orchestrated numerous shootings and armed robberies using an arsenal of firearms – including machine guns – and then took to social media to brag about their incredibly destructive criminal conduct,” he said. continued Levy. “Caruso, along with his mother and co-conspirator Laurie Caruso, breathed poison and violence into our communities and you won’t hear about it on Instagram for a long time.

Vincent “Fatz” Caruso, 27, and his mother Laurie Caruso, 52, paved the streets north of Boston with hundreds of thousands of fake prescription pills that actually contained fentanyl – a drug 50 times more potent than heroin, according to the CDC — which the Lynn family pressed at home in their own high-volume pill presses.

Both were arrested and charged by complaint on June 30, 2021, alongside associates Ernest “Yo Pesci” Johnson and Nicole Benton – who each pleaded guilty to their own roles and are due for sentencing in September – in connection with an investigation into an increase in shootings in communities north of Boston in 2020.

“Fatz” on March 15 pleaded guilty to significant charges for his role in drug trafficking: one count of conspiracy to manufacture, distribute and possess with intent to distribute 400 grams or more of fentanyl, cocaine, marijuana and other controlled substances; a count of conspiracy to possess firearms in pursuit of a drug trafficking felony; conspiracy to obstruct trade by theft; and one count of conspiracy to commit money laundering.

He was sentenced Thursday by U.S. District Court Judge Denise J. Casper in federal court in Boston to 250 months in prison, or more than 20½ years.

Laurie Caruso – who pleaded guilty on February 28 to one count of conspiracy to manufacture, distribute and possess with intent to distribute fentanyl and other controlled substances – was sentenced by the court judge on Wednesday U.S. District Attorney Nathaniel Gorton to nine years in prison and four years in prison. supervised release.

At least “Fatz” hasn’t been shy about showing his money. He posted much of his purchases on his Instagram account — as Levy alluded to in his statement — including the sparkling “FATZ” locket hanging from a heavy gold (or gold-plated) chain around a neck that spots a “Menace II Society” tattoo that shows about as much artistry as he’ll likely find behind federal bars.

  • Vincent “Fatz” Caruso, 27, a convicted fentanyl dealer, will be sentenced this week in federal court. The U.S. Attorney’s Office released several photos in pre-sentence documents from social media and warrant searches. (Court documents from the U.S. Attorney’s Office.)

  • vincent

    Vincent “Fatz” Caruso, 27, a convicted fentanyl dealer, will be sentenced this week in federal court. The U.S. Attorney’s Office released several photos in pre-sentence documents from social media and warrant searches. (Court documents from the U.S. Attorney’s Office.)

  • vincent

    Vincent “Fatz” Caruso, 27, a convicted fentanyl dealer, will be sentenced this week in federal court. The U.S. Attorney’s Office released several photos in pre-sentence documents from social media and warrant searches. (Court documents from the U.S. Attorney’s Office.)

  • vincent

    Vincent “Fatz” Caruso, 27, a convicted fentanyl dealer, will be sentenced this week in federal court. The U.S. Attorney’s Office released several photos in pre-sentence documents from social media and warrant searches. Guess he couldn’t finish his Krave snack. (Court documents from the U.S. Attorney’s Office.)

  • vincent

    Vincent “Fatz” Caruso, 27, a convicted fentanyl dealer, will be sentenced this week in federal court. The U.S. Attorney’s Office released several photos in pre-sentence documents from social media and warrant searches. (Court documents from the U.S. Attorney’s Office.)

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